Physical Education

* This is a Material Intensive Elective. Confirmed enrolment in this Elective is conditional on payment of the Material Intensive charge of $130.

There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4. Units 1 to 4 are designed to a standard equivalent to the final two years of secondary education.

Each unit involves at least 50 hours of scheduled classroom instruction.

VCE Physical Education explores the complex interrelationships between anatomical, biomechanical, physiological and skill acquisition principles to understand their role in producing and refining movement, and examines behavioural, psychological, environmental and sociocultural influences on performance and participation in physical activity.

The study of VCE Physical Education enables students to integrate a contemporary understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of performance and participation in physical activity with practical application. Through engagement in physical activities, VCE Physical Education enables students to develop the knowledge and skills required to critically evaluate influences that affect their own and others’ performance and participation in physical activity. This study equips students with the appropriate knowledge and skills to plan, develop and maintain their involvement in physical activity, sport and exercise across their lifespan and to understand the physical, social, emotional and cognitive health benefits associated with being active. The study also prepares students for employment and/or further study at the tertiary level or in vocational education and training settings in fields such as exercise and sport science, health science, education, recreation, sport development and coaching, health promotion and related careers.

The study is made up of four units:
Unit 1: The human body in motion
Unit 2: Physical Activity, sport and society
Unit 3: Movement skills and energy for physical activity
Unit 4: Training to improve performance

Unit 1 The human body in motion

AREA OF STUDY 1: How does the musculoskeletal system work to produce movement?

In this unit students explore how the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems work together to produce movement. Through practical activities students explore the relationships between the body systems and physical activity, sport and exercise, and how the systems adapt and adjust to the demands of the activity. Students investigate the role and function of the main structures in each system and how they respond to physical activity, sport and exercise. They explore how the capacity and functioning of each system acts as an enabler or barrier to movement and participation in physical activity.

AREA OF STUDY 2: How does the cardiorespiratory system function at rest and during physical activity? 

In this area of study students examine the cardiovascular and respiratory systems of the human body and how the heart, blood vessels and lungs function at rest and during physical activity. Through practical activities students explore the structure and function of the cardiorespiratory system and their contributions and interactions during physical activity, sport and exercise. Enablers and barriers to the capacity and functioning of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems are investigated from a sociocultural, environmental and physical perspective. Students explore the ethical and performance considerations of the use of a variety of legal and illegal practices and substances specific to each system.

 

Outcomes

1: On completion of this unit students should be able to collect and analyse information from, and participate in, a variety of practical activities to explain how the musculoskeletal system functions and its limiting conditions, and evaluate the ethical and performance implications of the use of practices and substances that enhance human movement.

2: On completion of this unit students should be able to collect and analyse information from, and participate in, a variety of practical activities to explain how the cardiovascular and respiratory systems function and the limiting conditions of each system, and discuss the ethical and performance implications of the use of practices and substances to enhance the performance of these two systems.

 

Unit 2 Physical activity, sport and society

AREA OF STUDY 1: What are relationships between physical activity, sport, health and society?

In this area of study students focus on the role of physical activity, sport and society in developing and promoting healthy lifestyles and participation in physical activity across the lifespan. Students explore the social, cultural and historical influences on participation in various forms of physical activity, including sport. They investigate at the individual and population levels the physical, social, mental and emotional benefits of participation in regular physical activity and the potential negative physical, social, mental and emotional consequences of physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour, including hypokinetic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes and obesity.

AREA OF STUDY 2: What are contemporary issues associated with physical activity and sport?

In this area of study students focus on a range of contemporary issues associated with physical activity and/or sport at the local, national and global level. They investigate in detail one issue relevant to physical activity and/ or sport. Possible issues suitable for investigation include declining levels of physical activity across the lifespan, active transport, gender equity in physical activity and sport, cultural diversity and inclusion in physical activity, risk management and safety in physical activity and sport, children and competitive sport, the community and recreation, access to physical activity for population groups such as children, rural and remote communities, cultural groups, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and people with disabilities.

Outcomes

1: On completion of this unit the student should be able to collect and analyse data related to individual and population levels of participation in physical activity and sedentary behaviour to create, undertake and evaluate an activity plan that meets the physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines for an individual or a specific group.

2: On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply a social-ecological framework to research, analyse and evaluate a contemporary issue associated with participation in physical activity and/or sport in a local, national or global setting.

Unit 3 Movement skills and energy for physical activity

AREA OF STUDY 1: How are movement skills improved?

How are movement skills improved? In this area of study students examine the biomechanical and skill acquisition principles that can be applied when analysing and improving movement skills used in physical activity and sport. Through coaching and involvement in a variety of practical activities, students investigate and analyse movements to develop an understanding of how the correct application of biomechanical and skill acquisition principles leads to greater efficiency and accuracy in movement skills.

AREA OF STUDY 2: How does the body produce energy?

Students explore the various systems and mechanisms associated with the production of energy required for human movment. They consider the cardiovascular, respiratory ans muscular systems ans roles of each in supplying oxygen and energy to the working muscles. Students examine the way in which energy for activity is produced byt he three energy systems and the associated fuels used for activities of vary intensity and duration.They also look at fatigue and receivery strategies.

 

Outcomes

1: On completion of this unit the student should be able to collect and analyse information from, and participate in, a variety of physical activities to develop and refine movement skills from a coaching perspective, through the application of biomechanical and skill acquisition principles.

2: On completion of this unit the student should be able to use data collected in practical activities to analyse how the major body and energy systems work together to enable movements to occur, and explain the factors causing fatigue and suitable recovery strategies.

 

Unit 4 Training to improve performance

AREA OF STUDY 1: What are the foundations of an effective training program? 

What are the foundations of an effective training program? In this area of study students focus on the information required to form the foundation of an effective training program. They use data from an activity analysis and determine the fitness requirements of a selected physical activity. They also use data collected from participating in a series of fitness tests to inform the design of the training program. Students determine the relevant factors that affect each of the fitness components, and conduct a series of fitness tests that demonstrate correct and ethical implementation of testing protocols and procedures.

AREA OF STUDY 2: How is training implemented effectively to improve fitness?

How is training implemented effectively to improve fitness? In this area of study students focus on the implementation and evaluation of training principles and methods from a practical and theoretical perspective. They consider the manner in which fitness can be improved through the application of appropriate training principles and methods. Students identify and consider components of an exercise training session, they monitor, record and adjust training. Students explain the chronic adaptations to the cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems.

 

Outcomes

1: On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse data from an activity analysis and fitness tests to determine and assess the fitness components and energy system requirements of the activity

2: On completion of this unit the student should be able to participate in a variety of training methods, and design and evaluate training programs to enhance specific fitness components.

 

Assessment

Units 1 and 2

Diamond Valley College will determine the level of achievement. A selection of levels of achievement using grades, descriptive statements or other indicators may be used.

Units 3 and 4

School-assessed coursework and examination:

  • Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 %
  • Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 %
  • End-of-year examination: 50 %

Contact Teacher - Grant Sargent